3 Options For Getting Rid Of Old Carpet

Posted by on Feb 29, 2016 in Uncategorized |

There are many reasons why you might be thinking about ripping out your old carpet and installing new flooring in your home. Your carpet might be old and worn out, or you might be looking to install wood floors or another modern option. You may just be looking for a change, and you probably know that installing new flooring is a great way to give your home a different look. Regardless, you could be wondering what to do with your old carpet once you rip it out of your house. Luckily, you have a few options. 1. Turn It Into Rugs First of all, you can turn your old carpet into rugs. All you have to do is carefully measure out the area that you would like to cut, then mark it on the piece of carpet. Then, use a razor blade or utility knife to carefully cut out the rug. You can use it as-is for now, but the ends will eventually fray, so it’s best to add a binder around the edges. Luckily, you can purchase binding at a carpet store or home improvement store and can apply it with carpet glue. 2. Give it Away Even though you might not want your carpet anymore, others might, particularly if it’s in pretty good condition. Consider advertising it on an online classifieds website. Just make sure that you add all of the basic information, such as the approximate square footage of each piece. Not only is this a good way to get rid of your old carpet, but it can help someone out who wants to add flooring to their home but doesn’t have a lot of money. Plus, it’s a great method of recycling your old materials. 3. Rent a Dumpster If you want to make things as easy as possible, consider hiring a dumpster rental company. Make sure that the dumpster rental company knows that you will be using it for construction materials, and then toss the carpet and padding in the dumpster as you pull it out of your home. This makes it easy for you to clean up as you go, and the dumpster might come in handy for other garbage from your home remodeling project. Then, when you’re finished, the dumpster rental company will come out and pick up the dumpster for you. If you are looking to get rid of the carpet in your home, these are a few options that you can consider. Then, you won’t have to worry about the hassle of getting rid of your old flooring. Visit a site like http://www.dibussolocontainerservice.com for more information about dumpster...

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Three Keys to Operating a Pallet Jack Safely

Posted by on Feb 29, 2016 in Uncategorized |

If you’ve been tasked with moving boxes or other stored items located on pallets around your warehouse at work, a pallet jack will be a valuable ally from the start to the end of this job. Given the heavy-duty nature of this device and the strenuous manner of the task, it’s important that you make safety a priority. Doing so involves reading the pallet jack’s manual and thoroughly familiarizing yourself with the controls before beginning the work. Here are three specific tips that you should keep in mind while you operate the pallet jack. Push the Pallet Jack One of the keys to safely operating the pallet jack is to only maneuver it through pushing. You should never pull a pallet jack for multiple reasons. Pushing this device requires you to use proper ergonomics — you should stand behind the handle, grip it with both hands and put your weight into it as you move forward. When you attempt to pull the pallet jack, you’ll have your body contorted and you won’t be able to put your weight behind the load, which means that you have a risk of straining a muscle in your upper body. Pushing the pallet jack also means that you’re facing the direction that you’re traveling, giving you clear visibility of the safest path to take. Walk the Intended Route First Once you’ve loaded up the pallet jack, it’s beneficial to take a couple minutes to walk the route that you plan to take. Doing so without pushing the pallet jack gives you the ability to be more aware of hazards such as sharp turns or low-hanging objects that could disrupt your path. If you’re unsure of your ability to access a specific area, it’s better to measure the pallet jack’s width and then measure the area of the warehouse in question to avoid getting stuck later. Be Careful When You’re on Ramps If your warehouse has ramps, you’ll have to be extra careful to maneuver the pallet jack and its heavy load along this change in grade. If you’re going down the ramp, keep the pallet jack’s brakes partially engaged and take small steps forward; don’t try to zoom down the ramp quickly, as you might be out of control at the end and have an accident. When you’re traveling up a ramp, keep your body square with the device to avoid muscle strains and be ready to apply the brakes if you’re struggling with the change in grade. For information about pallet jacks and how to properly use them, consider contacting a local supplier, such as Garland’s,...

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Common Problems To Watch For With Your Air Compressor

Posted by on Feb 28, 2016 in Uncategorized |

If you’re buying your first air compressor, understanding how to spot signs of a problem can be important. With so many internal components and unusual noises, it can be tough to narrow down the source of an issue otherwise. The good news is that when you understand some of the things that could happen with the compressor, it can simplify the troubleshooting process. Here are a few common issues you might experience along with some advice for resolving them. Unusual Noises Compressors are not quiet equipment, but that doesn’t mean that your new compressor should be excessively noisy. Familiarize yourself with the sounds that your compressor normally makes so that you can identify any unusual noises right away. For example, if the compressor starts to squeal, rattle or whine, it’s a pretty good sign that something isn’t right. Shut the machine off and check the oil first. If the oil level is low, top it off. Then, turn it back on again and let it run for a minute or two. Listen to see if the added oil quiets the noise. If not, shut it off again and check the flywheel, belts and pulleys. They should all be tight. Tighten any bolts if necessary. If this doesn’t solve the problem, you’ll need to have the compressor serviced, as it could be a problem with the cylinder head. Discoloration in the Oil You should check the oil in the compressor on a regular basis. If that oil is hazy, creamy-colored or milky, it’s an indication of moisture problems. Water in the oil creates this reaction. It usually happens when the environment where the compressor is running is very humid. Try running a dehumidifier in the shop or moving the intake lines to somewhere drier. In addition, change the oil right away when you see this kind of discoloration. Persistent Knocking An air compressor that knocks persistently when it’s running often has a loose flywheel or a bearing that’s going bad. This is particularly likely when the noise is rhythmic. Shut down the compressor and check the flywheel condition. It should be tight. If it’s loose, tighten the central mounting bolt. If this doesn’t stop the noise, a technician will have to check the connecting rod bearings and the main bearings inside the unit. An air compressor is a valuable investment for most any garage or shop. This is particularly beneficial if you’re running power tools of any kind. Understanding these common signs of trouble will help you avoid complete equipment failure and protect your compressor investment. For more help, talk with a local air compressor service technician who can help you with a service plan to care for it. Contact...

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Should You Use Heating Oil Additives To Extend The Life Of Your Furnace?

Posted by on Feb 27, 2016 in Uncategorized |

If you use an oil-burning furnace to heat your home during winter, you’ve likely been enjoying the extended slump in crude prices. While lower fill up rates can help your dollars stretch further, you may still find yourself needing refills mid-winter (often during inclement weather) or dealing with clogged vents or dirty filters. Should you include a commercial additive with your home’s heating oil? Read on to learn about some popular additives and the benefits they can provide to your oil-burning furnace.  What do heating oil additives do? Although straight crude oil is combustible enough to be used as heating fuel on its own, most oil companies add a number of substances to this oil before sale to prevent it from freezing and otherwise make it more “shelf-stable” and less likely to clog or damage your furnace. However, due to the way modern heating oil is mixed before delivery, even oil with additives mixed in may become unstable and separate during long-term storage. This process allows sludge and deposits to sink to the bottom of your oil storage tank — and because most oil furnaces draw from the bottom of the tank (to help ensure you’ll have heat even when your fuel tank is growing close to empty), you’ll run the risk of clogging your pipes or harming your furnace if you don’t use additives to prevent this sludge from forming. Some additives are solvents, designed to neutralize the sludge in oil by thinning it out (much like turpentine can render oil-based paint runny and thin). But because adding large quantities of solvents to your fuel oil supply may not be feasible, many of the most popular additives instead use stabilizers which are designed to prevent the oil from separating and allowing sludge to flow to the bottom of the tank. Should you add these substances to your heating oil supply?  In the vast majority of cases, adding stabilizing additives to your fuel oil is a very worthwhile decision. These additives are available at a relatively low cost and can help prevent costly repairs to your furnace or fuel tank that could leave your home without heat for days. However, there is one exception to this rule. If you’re using home-distilled biodiesel fuel in place of heating oil, you’re unlikely to need any additional stabilizers. Biodiesel contains natural solvents that can burn out any residue remaining in your pipes or furnace and shouldn’t require additional treatment to remain...

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Caring For Rectangular Screens To Minimize Production Downtime

Posted by on Feb 26, 2016 in Uncategorized |

If you work with a rectangular screening separator to sift smaller particles away from a larger mass during an assembly line process, you will want to take steps in selecting and caring for the screens used to do this work. Using the wrong type of screen or failing to do routine maintenance on the ones you use can lead to an unfortunate halt to production. To avoid this, use these tips to keep your screens in the best possible condition. Select The Right Type Of Screen For The Job Not all screens work the same at separating smaller portions of a substance from a larger piece. If you use a screen with holes that are too small, pieces of the material can become trapped inside these voids, possibly clogging the entire screen after it runs for a short while. It is important to know what the approximate size of the separated material will be before selecting screens to fit your machine. Since screens come in an abundance of hole sizes, selecting one that fits this approximation will keep the screens from clogging. If the product cannot easily be ground down to a powder form, it may need to be altered by adding water or a chemical beforehand. Do not rely on the screens to do the job in separating of the material you are trying to consolidate if it does not disintegrate easily.  Keep Screens Cleaned To Keep Production Moving When using screens, you will usually have a series of two or three different types for the matter to be pushed through. During this process, it is possible some of the holes will become filled with material. This will need to be removed to keep production moving. Taking the time to remove the screens and give them a cleaning will take less time than trying to repair a piece of machinery that has become clogged with material because matter could no longer fit through the screen holes. Check on the screens every hour or two to make sure there is no accumulation of material inside each tray. At the first sign of a build up, stop the equipment, remove the screens and rinse them down to remove embedded matter from the screen holes.  Have Backups Available For Busy Production Times If you cannot afford to take time to clean a screen due to a deadline you must meet for your employer, it can be beneficial to have a set of spare screens on hand for this reason. Keep extra screens near your rectangular screening equipment to do a quick swap when matter seems to be building up inside the holes. Have another employee rinse the original screens used so...

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